Computer Science

 

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Subject Leader: Mr K Bhutia

Subject Leader Email Address: kesang.bhutia@swale.at

 

Computers themselves, and software yet to be developed, will revolutionize the way we learn.

STEVE JOBS

Subject Overview

In computing, students will learn how computer systems work, from the physical components (the hardware) to the apps and programs that users interact with (the software). They will also learn how to create and manipulate computer systems and how to apply the skills and approaches that they pick up in computing to tackle real-life problems creatively.

Computing gives students a wide range of skills that they can apply to other subjects and use in their careers, and opens the doorway to new and emerging career paths. IT companies like Google and Microsoft helped the government to design the course because they want to make sure young people have the digital skills employers look for today.

Computing complements maths because it teaches logical thinking and problem-solving. Students can use the skills they develop in computing to help them analyse and solve maths problems. Computing will help them with any subjects which require a degree of critical thinking.

Year 7

Pupils will be taught how to use technology safely and how to protect their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct; and know how to report concerns. They will also learn the basic components of a computer system and the difference between hardware and software. They will understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking and understand what a flowchart is and how to create some basic flowcharts. They will learn Micro Bit programming concepts like input/output statements, arithmetic operators and selection statements. They will also learn simple Boolean logic (for example, AND, OR and NOT) and how to create simple logic circuits.

Year 8

Pupils will be taught a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; how to recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct; and how to report concerns. They will learn about types of malware, social engineering and prevention methods. They will also learn to identify the main components of a computer system, the CPU and types of secondary storage.
They will learn several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking (for example, ones for sorting and searching), and write their own flowchart/algorithm to search items (Linear search) and to sort items (Insertion sort). They will learn Pencil code programming and how to write input/output statements, use arithmetic operators and selection/loop statements. They will understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers like conversion between binary and decimal.
They will undertake creative projects using spreadsheets that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications, to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users.

Year 9

Pupils will be taught how to identify network security threats, types of network attacks, bias and reliability of data and prevention methods for these threats. They will learn about the functions of main components of a computer system, the CPU and how it affects the system performance, different types of secondary storage and features and functions of different types of system software. They will learn the key principles of computational thinking and use these principles to find solutions to real world problems.
They will learn to write flowchart/algorithms to search items (linear/binary) and sort items (bubble/insertion). They will also learn basic Python programming such as using input/output statements, arithmetic and relational operators and selection/loop statements to solve a variety of computational problems. They will also undertake creative projects that involve selecting, using, and combining multiple applications to achieve challenging goals, including collecting and analysing data and meeting the needs of known users.

Year 10 / Year 11 IT

The Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award in Digital Information Technology gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The main focus is on four areas of equal importance, which cover the:

  • development of key skills that prove your aptitude in digital information technology, such as project planning, designing and creating user interfaces, creating dashboards to present and interpret data
  • process that underpins effective ways of working in digital information technology, such as project planning, the iterative design process, cyber security, virtual teams, legal and ethical codes of conduct
  • attitudes that are considered most important in digital information technology, including personal management and communication
  • knowledge that underpins effective use of skills, process and attitudes in the sector such as how different user interfaces meet user needs, how organisations collect and use data to make decisions, virtual workplaces, cyber security and legal and ethical issues.

 

Why study this course?


This award is for learners who want to acquire technical knowledge and technical skills through vocational contexts by studying the knowledge, understanding and skills related to data management, data interpretation, data presentation and data protection as part of their Key Stage 4 learning. The qualification recognises the value of learning skills, knowledge and vocational attributes to complement GCSEs. The qualification will broaden the learners’ experience and understanding of the varied progression options available to them.

 

What does this course lead on to?


Study of the qualification as part of Key Stage 4 learning will help learners to make more informed choices for further learning, either generally or in this sector. The choices that learners can make in the sixth form will depend on their overall level of attainment and their performance in the qualification. Learners who generally achieve at Level 2 across their Key Stage 4 learning might consider progression to A level, as preparation for entry to higher education in a range of subjects; or study a vocational qualification at Level 3, such as a BTEC National in IT, which prepares learners to enter employment or apprenticeships; or move on to higher education by studying for a degree in the digital sector.

Year 10 Computer Science

OCR’s GCSE (9–1) in Computer Science will encourage learners to:

  • understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms, and data representation
  • analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs
  • think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  • understand the components that make up digital systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society and apply mathematical skills relevant to computer science.

Why study this course?

This qualification will build on the knowledge, understanding and skills established through the
computer science elements of the Key Stage 3 programme of study. The content has been designed not only to allow for a solid basis of understanding, but to engage learners and get them thinking about real world application. This exciting GCSE gives you an excellent opportunity to investigate how computers work and how they’re used, and to develop computer programming and problem-solving skills. You’ll also do some fascinating in-depth research and practical work. For example, some of the current investigations look at Python coding, encryption and assembly language programming. 

What does this course lead on to?

OCR’s GCSE (9–1) Computer Science specification encourages learners to be inspired and challenged through completing a coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. The specification will help learners to gain an insight into related sectors. It will prepare learners to make informed decisions about further learning opportunities and career choices.

Year 11 Computer Science

OCR’s GCSE (9–1) in Computer Science will encourage learners to:

  • understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms, and data representation
  • analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs
  • think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  • understand the components that make up digital systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society and apply mathematical skills relevant to computer science.

Why study this course?

The qualification will build on the knowledge, understanding and skills established through the computer science elements of the Key Stage 3 programme of study. The content has been designed not only to allow for a solid basis of understanding, but to engage learners and get them thinking about real world application. This exciting GCSE gives you an excellent opportunity to investigate how computers work and how they’re used, and to develop computer programming and problem-solving skills. You’ll also do some fascinating in-depth research and practical work. For example, some of the current investigations look at Python coding, encryption and assembly language programming. 

What does this course lead on to?

OCR’s GCSE (9–1) Computer Science specification encourages learners to be inspired and challenged through completing a coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. The specification will help learners to gain an insight into related sectors. It will prepare learners to make informed decisions about further learning opportunities and career choices.

Sixth Form

The Pearson BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate in Computing is designed to support learners who are interested in learning about the computing sector alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in the computing sector.
You will enjoy this course if you are interested in increasing your knowledge of computer science whilst developing employability skills such as:

  •  cognitive and problem-solving skills
  •  intrapersonal skills like communicating, working collaboratively, negotiation
  •  interpersonal skills like self-management, adaptability, resilience.


Students study a wide range of computing skills ranging from understanding basic computer hardware to identifying and troubleshooting complex hardware problems. They learn to write computer programs to create websites, games and bespoke software. Students will cover a range of practical content where they will develop employability skills like teamwork, communication, project work, research and assessment skills.
They will become reflective practitioners working to deadlines. A range of topics will be covered within this qualification, such as principles of computer science (software development), computer games development, fundamentals of computer systems (computer hardware) and IT security systems.

What does this course lead on to?


This course prepares students for employment in many areas of IT, as well as qualifying them to study for an HNC/D or Degree such as Computing (Foundation Degree), Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) BSc, Computer Science (Networks) BSc, Computer Science with Games Technology BSc, Business Computing BSc and Forensic Computing BSc.